Yellowfin Tuna, Avocado Pineapple Mash

Seared Fresh Yellowfin Tuna
Mirin, Sesame Oil, Tamari, Key Lime Juice
Avocado Pineapple Mash with Serrano
Steamed Jasmine Rice

Avocado, crushed pineapple, finely chopped serrano chiles, a squeeze of key lime juice and a pinch of Kosher salt are mashed together with a fork. Avocado and pineapple make an interesting flavor combination, perfect complement to the fish.

Whisk together equal parts mirin, sesame oil, and tamari, plus half as much key lime juice. Divide in half, one part for serving the other part for seasoning the tuna.

The sashimi grade tuna is coated with the sauce just prior to cooking. It is not left to marinate for more than a few minutes per side, as with fish this fresh, I did not want to mask the delicate complex flavors of the fish.

I used that great SCANPAN ceramic titanium non-stick fry pan from Denmark here! Heat the dry pan until very hot and add the tuna. Sear over high heat about 60 seconds per side. Serve the yellowfin tuna over the sauce with a scoop of avocado pineapple mash, steamed jasmine rice on the side. We thoroughly enjoyed this meal with a White Bordeaux, although a lighter style Burgundy/Pinot Noir would have been a good choice as well. For a terrific recipe using a similar sauce with king salmon, please visit here.
FRESH FISH ALERT !!!

Imagine my excitement when I walked into my neighborhood butcher shop to see Darko filleting his Yellowfin Tuna! Intentions to get anything other than yellowfin tuna went out the window! I was so glad to have my camera on hand too.

South Shores Meat Shop
Western Avenue at 25th Street
San Pedro, California


Tuna Facts: There are two species of tuna known as ahi, yellowfin and bigeye. Tunas are the fastest fish in the world; in fact, bursts of speed exceeding 20-30 mph are not unusual. They have streamlined bodies specifically adapted for efficient swimming, large white muscle masses useful for swimming long distances, and red muscle masses for short bursts of speed when chasing prey or escaping predators. For more interesting information on yellowfin tuna, nutrition, and sustainability status you can visit FishWatch.

Anise-Ginger Lamb Shank

Braised and Grilled Lamb Shanks
with Tamari,  Star Anise, Ginger, Garlic

The braising liquid is made with tamari, water, star anise, garlic cloves, sliced fresh ginger and sugar.

The shanks are simmered for over 2 hours in my Le Creuset covered French Oven.

The shanks are then seasoned with salt and pepper, grilled for about 15 minutes, until nicely browned. Meanwhile to prepare the sauce: use a fat separator to remove most of the fat, return the sauce to the pot and heat on high. Dilute 1 T. cornstarch with 1 T. cold water and whisk into the sauce to thicken just slightly. Add a splash of rice vinegar, salt and pepper to taste.
Many recipes for shanks use red wine as the braising liquid, like this one with Zinfandel. Last weekend, we were quite pleased with the exotic combination of tastes of tamari, anise, ginger and garlic. Whatever liquid/sauce you choose, I highly recommend the method of braising and grilling the lamb shanks, as this technique gives the meat an added dimension of flavor.
This recipe was adapted from Mark Bittman. The original recipe can be found here. After picking up four beautiful shanks from the butcher, I was searching the internet for a recipe for “braised and grilled” lamb shanks and came across his. It’s a winner!

Toasted Seaweed Crusted Salmon, Lemon Tamari

King Salmon, Crusted with Toasted Seaweed
Lemon Mirin Tamari Sauce, Wasabi Butter


Whisk together lemon juice, mirin, low-sodium Tamari and olive oil for the sauce.


Fresh Wild King Salmon from British Columbian waters is crusted with a mixture of ground toasted seaweed, sesame seeds, red pepper flakes, sea salt and fresh ground pepper.

The salmon is sautéed in olive oil over medium high heat for about 3 to 4 minutes per side.

Place the salmon over the sauce and top with wasabi butter.

Does this sound familiar? In April we prepared a beef filet in a similar style, which was awesome. And it is equally good with salmon.

I recently received an email from Emily at Marx Foods. They’re hosting a salmon recipe contest: WIN A SUMMER OF WILD SALMON. The creator of the winning recipe will receive 15 lbs. of wild salmon – three 5 lb. shipments, once in July, August and September. Each shipment will contain a different type of wild salmon, varying by species and river origin. Doesn’t that sound like fun! Salmon should be the star of the dish, but the recipe can incorporate any variety of salmon-fresh, frozen, smoked, canned, pickled, etc. The contest deadline is June 20. There are about 100 recipes already submitted and posted on their website, and many of them sound terrific.

Filet Mignon, Nori Crust, Wasabi Butter

Nori Crusted Filet Mignon over a Lemon Mirin Soy Sauce
Topped with Wasabi Butter

As a nibble…on grilled ciabatta bread.

8 oz. Filet Mignon

Nori (roasted seaweed) is ground with white sesame seeds, red chile flakes, and black pepper in a food processor.

Two 8 oz. filets are seasoned, then dredged in the nori mixture and seared in olive oil for about 4 minutes per side. The meat is finished in a 400 degree oven.

Olive oil, mirin, tamari, and fresh lemon juice are whisked together for a sauce. Fresh lemon juice and steak – this is an amazing pairing.

For a large group, a 2 1/2 pound filet is cut in half.

A remote thermometer is helpful, we removed the meat from the oven at 128, and then let rest for 10 minutes.

I have made this Japanese Style Steak three times now. I cannot rave enough about the combination of flavors which are extraordinary. You can find this fabulous recipe here by DFresh on Foodbuzz which was inspired by a dish in Food & Wine Magazine.