Socca (savory chickpea pancake)

Socca (savory chickpea pancakes)

Socca (savory chickpea pancake)

Topped with a Salad of Spring Lettuce
Egg, Feta, Radish, Chili, Olives, Dill, Lemon, Tahini Sauce

Socca, a savory chickpea pancake, is known as Nice’s original street food. Often served au naturel in Provence, cut into shards as snack, pleasantly with a glass of chilled rosé. Socca can also be served with all kinds of toppings for a delightful lunch. It is usually baked on a large round flat copper pan in a wood-burning oven.

In this recipe, nontraditional cumin and smoked paprika added to the batter mimic the smokiness of a wood-burning oven. And a non-stick skillet on the stovetop stands in for the copper pan and makes cooking the socca a breeze.

Socca As A Snack with Rosé

Socca as a snack with Rosé

Socca Recipe

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Caramelized Baby Carrots, Prickly Pear Cactus Syrup

Caramelized Baby Carrots, Prickly Pear Cactus Syrup

Caramelized Baby French Carrots
Prickly Pear Cactus Syrup
Scallions, Mint, Dill, Pine Nuts, Edible Flower Petals

There aren’t many Easter posts on Taste With The Eyes, because, you know, we celebrate Passover here… I’ve already shared my new matzoh ball recipe, and have a fabulous cold poached salmon with 3 horseradish sauces in the wings.

But today, Easter Sunday, I had some beautiful Baby French Carrots on hand, so they were roasted with Prickly Pear Cactus Syrup (we live in the desert after all) and they turned out surprisingly delicious. Sweet, savory, nutty, herby. I dressed them up for Spring with some flower petals, and I think they would make a fabulous Easter side dish.

Extending my best wishes to you, my friends, for a glorious Easter.

Caramelized Baby Carrot Recipe

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Broccoli Cauliflower Soup with Dubliner Cheese

Broccoli Cauliflower Soup with Dubliner Cheese

Broccoli Cauliflower Soup with Dubliner Cheese

Dubliner is a robust aged cow’s milk cheese from West Cork, Ireland with a texture similar to a cheddar. It has nutty, sharp, sweet flavors that come from the milk of Irish grass-fed cows.

Here, the ubiquitous broccoli cheese soup is taken to another level – adding another vegetable profile – cauliflower, and creamy earthy white beans plus Irish cheese for a St. Paddy’s Day celebration!

The silky smooth texture is achieved by the action of a high-performance blender. It is that velvety texture that makes the soup so extraordinary. It could easily be served naked…

…but the blank green canvas begs for something jazzy. Queue up a range of garnishes such as micro greens, super-thin radish, chili oil, shredded cheese, and even a creamy shamrock! Erin go bragh.

A St. Paddy’s Soup Recipe

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Cauliflower and Aged Gouda Soufflé

Cauliflower and Aged Gouda Soufflé

Cauliflower and Aged Gouda Soufflé

These delightful soufflés are perfect for a springtime luncheon! 36 month-aged Gouda from the Netherlands adds nutty, butterscotch flavors and an interesting salt crystal crunchy texture. This flavorful cheese pairs well with a full-bodied complex Alsatian Pinot Gris.

The soufflés are super easy to prepare, and bake up to a puffed golden brown in 35 minutes. Served with a pretty side salad, they make a lovely light lunch…or easily double the recipe and serve them on a platter as part of a buffet because, as a bonus, the soufflés hardly deflate so they are excellent for entertaining.

Cauliflower Soufflé Recipe

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Fromage Langres et Champagne

Fromage Langres et Champagne

Kicking off my first post of 2022 with a theatrical Champagne and Cheese Course. Not just any cheese, but a special cow’s milk cheese that originates from the plateau of Langres in the Champagne region of France.

What Grows Together, Goes Together

A broadly accurate principle for matching wine with a particular food is to choose components from the same region…the pairing of fromage Langres (pronounced Lawn-gruh) with Champagne is no exception.

A Unique Cheese

Langres is only rotated once during maturation. The weight of the liquid in the cheese causes it to collapse creating its signature concave cap. The dent on top is the result of the cheese not being turned as it matures, making the cheese settle in the center. It is not exactly clear who originally thought that this dent would be the perfect place to splash some Champagne, but it is!

To Serve Fromage Langres et Champagne

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