Kimchi Stew with Kale, Pork, and Silken Tofu ~ Soondubu Jjigae

Kimchi Stew with Kale, Pork, and Silken Tofu ~ Soondubu Jjigae

Kimchi Stew with Kale, Pork, and Silken Tofu ~ Soondubu Jjigae

My non-traditional version of the popular Korean tofu stew, soondubu jJigae, is flexible. I always start with kimchi and silken tofu, then perhaps add vegetables such as spinach, mushrooms, or daikon; broth can be anchovy stock, chicken stock, or vegetable broth; it can be vegetarian or made with ground pork, beef, pork belly, or seafood; the salty component can come from soy sauce, or fish sauce, or salt; I sometimes add an egg… or not. I make this fast and easy stew often, changing ingredients with whatever is at hand.

I especially like the myriad of flavors, textures, and colors; it’s spicy, silky, and very satisfying. Last night, there was plenty of kale in the fridge, so that went into the stew as well.

My method is somewhat unorthodox too. I always like to cook the meat ahead of time and drain off the excess saturated fat. Then I use the more healthier olive oil to cook the stew. Flavorful toasted sesame oil is used as a finishing oil only, not in the cooking process.

Note: for a more standard version of soondubu jjigae, please visit any of the fabulous Korean bloggers in the side bar below.

Kimchi and Silken Tofu Stew Recipe

Continue reading “Kimchi Stew with Kale, Pork, and Silken Tofu ~ Soondubu Jjigae”

Roasted Mushroom Noodle Soup & Roasted Barley-Corn Tea

Roasted Mushroom Noodle Soup
Roasted Mushroom Noodle Soup

Oyster Mushroom, Rice Noodles, Ground Beef, Beef Stock
Zucchini, Egg, Pine Nuts, Scallion, Garlic, Sesame Oil, Chiles

Roasted Mushroom Noodle Soup & Roasted Barley-Corn Tea

Roasted Barley-Corn Tea

It was inspired by a Korean soup casually known as “marketplace noodles.” But here I use rice noodles for my gluten-free friends and roast the oyster mushrooms for added depth and richness. In addition to a homemade beef stock, a wild assortment of garnishes take what could be a simple mushroom noodle soup to another level… I would even serve it to David Chang.

Pair roasted mushroom noodle soup with a roasted barley-corn tea. This intriguing tea is a combination of Korean bori cha (barley tea) and oksusu cha (corn tea). Barley adds nutty, grain-like flavors while the corn flavor is reminiscent of grilled corn on the cob.

Roasted Mushroom Noodle Soup Recipe

Continue reading “Roasted Mushroom Noodle Soup & Roasted Barley-Corn Tea”

Celebrating the Lunar New Year with Korean Rice Cake Soup

Tteokguk (Korean Rice Cake Soup)

Tteokguk (Korean Rice Cake Soup) 떡국

Happy Lunar New Year! We’re celebrating with the Korean soup traditionally eaten on this day – Tteokguk. Rice Cake Soup is the main dish of Seollal (Lunar New Year). It is a day to express respect and gratitude, especially to one’s elders and one’s ancestors. The white color of the rice cakes is said to symbolize purity and cleanliness while their shape represents coins, symbolizing success and prosperity.

My version of tteokguk is not exactly traditional but I sure do love symbolic meals, that is one of the reasons why Passover is a favorite holiday. Here, I make a rich stock with roasted beef bones as well as brisket – to manifest a flavorful New Year. I add hot chiles – so our year will be spicy! I garnish with a rainbow of color – for a bright, brilliant, colorful year to come. And finish with edible flowers – for beauty and grace…

Tteokguk (Korean Rice Cake Soup) 떡국 Recipe

Continue reading “Celebrating the Lunar New Year with Korean Rice Cake Soup”

Kimchi Ramen with Korean Fried Dumpling

Kimchi Ramen with Korean Fried Dumpling

Seafood Kimchi Ramen (Haemul Kimchi Ramyun)
Shrimp & Kimchi Fried Dumpling (Goon Mandu)
Quail Egg, Fishcake, Roasted Seaweed, Shrimp, Scallion

We’re celebrating the re-dedication of our beloved Korean Friendship Bell by enjoying Korea’s most celebrated pickle dish – kimchi! There are several hundred types of kimchi which are made from various vegetables, fish, seafood, fruit, and herbs. Our recipe uses the most popular of all types of kimchi – napa cabbage kimchi – for the base of the soup and the filling for the fried dumplings.

Korean Friendship Bell

Kimchi is made by pickling vegetables (or other foods) with seasonings such as chili, ginger, garlic, and salt. Generally, there are two categories of kimchi – the “quick” kind which is made for immediate consumption or eaten within a few days just slightly fermented, and the other type in which the mixture is allowed to ferment and mature. Both methods result in Korea’s favorite dish – a delightfully pungent, robust food that is so much more than a side dish.

Continue reading “Kimchi Ramen with Korean Fried Dumpling”